3 Yoga Poses to Tap Into the Power of the New Moon in Pisces

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Let your heart lead you. That’s the message of the new Moon in Pisces on March 2, 2022. One of the most magical new Moons of the year, it asks you to explore what’s beyond your comfort zone and trust that our vulnerability will pay off in the long run. There is an invitation, with the energy of the intuitive water sign, to focus on your creativity, your dreams, and your inner wisdom. Allow yourself to dream.

Our bodies are channels and antennas for our embodied emotions. As you take yourself through certain poses, let yourself align with the potential of the new Moon. Amplify your yoga experience with intentionality. Allow your breath to be a vehicle to carry the feeling throughout your body, experience the sensations as they move through you, and visualize your intention.

These poses can be harnessed either as peak poses in a sequence that you build up to or, after a warmup, as more static poses, in the style of Yin Yoga, that you hold for more than just a few breaths. Modify as needed to meet you where you are at in the moment.

3 yoga poses to help you align with the new Moon in Pisces

For creativity: Utkata Konasana (Goddess Pose)

A person demonstrates Goddess Pose in yoga
(Photo: Erica Jung)

Why it helps: Our svadhisthana, or sacral, chakra is our seat of creativity and connection. A wealth of activation is waiting to be tapped into when we practice poses that emanate from our lower abdomen. This energy can sometimes lie dormant since focus in the lower abdomen is not as common in most asanas.

Ask yourself: “What calls to be expressed?”

How to: Stand with your feet wide apart and turn them outward at an angle. Bend your knees deeply, working toward bringing your thighs parallel to the floor. Remember to work within your ability. This is a space of exploration, not perfection. Align your knees over the center of your feet. Ensure that your shoulders are stacked above your hips. Lengthen the tailbone downward while lifting through the crown of your head.

Bring your palms to your sacral chakra, located 3–4 fingers width under your navel. This is your seat of creation. Play with sitting in the pose or exploring subtle undulations of movement such as moving from tailbone to crown in a snake-like motion or gently gliding in circle 8s. Picture your tailbone like a paintbrush as you “paint” your space on the mat. What do you feel called to create?

For dreams and desires: Sirsasana (Supported Headstand)

A person demonstrates Supported Headstand with blocks under the shoulders
(Photo: Erica Jung)

Why it helps: The ajna, or third eye, chakra,  is the seat of our intuition, clear thought, and spiritual contemplation. We can often feel blocked here from critical thinking and overthinking. Inversions clarify this energetic center. Working with blocks can make the pose more restorative versus activating. This pose is not recommended for those who have high blood pressure or brain injuries.

Ask yourself: “What dreams am I devoted to?”

How to: If using blocks, stack 2–3 (depending on your height needs) for each shoulder, shoulder-distance apart, against a wall for stability. Ideally, your head will rest ever so lightly on the ground or will be 1–2 inches off the ground. Create freedom in the neck, but safety in the structure. In the event that you don’t have enough blocks at home, consider leaving space to practice this pose before or after your studio class. Center your shoulders on the blocks and gently draw your legs up the wall. Relax your gaze or, if it’s comfortable for you, close your eyes. Draw yourself inward to gently focus on the third eye. Move through even and extended breaths, releasing any tension or stagnation through the top of the head.

When coming out, move slowly, first lowering your legs, then gently releasing off the blocks. Transition immediately into Balasana (Child’s Pose) and let yourself reacclimate before gently rising. Do not practice this pose for longer than 5 minutes.

For inner wisdom: Garudasana (Eagle Pose)

A person demonstrates Eagle Pose in yoga
(Photo: Erica Jung)

Why it helps: Wisdom comes from experience and good judgment. Eagle Pose is one of the most engaging yoga postures and has the ability to focus all of our senses on remaining centered, calm, and trusting of ourselves. It enables you to unlock your inner knowing.

Ask yourself: “What practices and habits keep me centered in trust?”

How to: Start in Utkatasana (Chair Pose). Transfer your weight into your left foot. Cross your right thigh over your left thigh as high as possible. Hook your right foot around your left calf. If it doesn’t hook, engage it on the outside of the calf or rest your toes on the mat.

Bring both arms out in front of you and parallel to the floor. Bend your arms and cross your left arm over your right, hooking at the elbows. With arms hooked, draw your forearms together and wrap your right palm around your left palm, crossing at the wrists, or bring the backs of your hands together. Lift your elbows to the height of your shoulders while keeping your shoulders sliding down away from your ears. Keep your back straight and perpendicular to the floor and lift through the crown of your head. Extend and deepen the breath evenly, feeling your intention. Stay here for 15–30 breaths, focusing your eyes on your thumbs or wrists. Release and stand in Tadasana (Mountain Pose) for 5–10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

See also: Your Astrological Forecast for March 2022


About our contributor

Erica Jung is a teacher, guide, and dedicated student to healing practices and embodied spirituality. Her journey with health, happiness, and easing of suffering was a calling from earliest childhood memories that led to formal education in psychology, nursing, yogic science, Lakota healing traditions, Reiki, somatic therapeutics, trauma therapy, plant medicines, and more.

An advocate for integrative approaches in an ever-increasingly complex world, she hopes the bridges she helps build ease their journeys back Home, bringing Light to the Shadows and unlocking our inner Healers. Erica’s passions and work extend into her 1:1 integrative healing coaching, international yoga workshops, global retreats, and speaking engagements, supporting those looking to deepen their relationship to Self and their Spirituality. Follow her on Instagram at @erica.jung.





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